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WOMEN SCIENTISTS TO BENEFIT FROM OWSD CAREER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM FUNDED BY CANADA’S INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH CENTRE (IDRC)

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Recently, the Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD) announced the 2019 beneficiaries of the Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD) Early Career fellowship programme of which funding for the fellowship is generously provided by Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC).

This is an affirmation of the aims of the Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC) “to eliminate obstacles faced by women scientists in low and middle-income countries in reaching their full potential as researches and leaders in academia and industry.”

According to Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC), “those who persevere in their scientific FUNDED BY CANADA’S INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH CENTRE (IDRC)careers encounter numerous obstacles in the workplace, such as part-time and precarious work, lower pay, higher teaching and administrative workload, and a challenging work-life balance”.

“In addition to such unfriendly work environments, women are often judged against unrealistic standards. They are expected to reach peak productivity at the onset of their careers, which coincides with their child-bearing years.”

“Many cannot travel as extensively as their male peers because of cultural restrictions with respect to mobility and family responsibilities. This limits opportunities for women scientists to attend international conferences and engage in collaborations.”

“By extension, this compromises their chances of publishing in world-class journals and of securing funding — a further detriment to their future career prospects.”

“Women scientists who venture outside of academia, for example in the tech sector, face similar challenges: difficult work-life balance, sexist work environments, and limited opportunities to climb the corporate ladder Women scientists who venture outside of academia, for example in the tech sector, face similar challenges: difficult work-life balance, sexist work environments, and limited opportunities to climb the corporate ladder.

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“Generally speaking, in both academia and industry, a lack of role models, mentors, and support networks to guide junior peers leaves women scientists isolated in confronting what is a shared challenge.”

Complementing this announcement, it was made known that, twenty women scientists from fourteen developing countries will receive up to 50,000 US Dollars.

The beneficiaries of the research grant are from different countries. Ghana, Sri Lanka, Benin Republic, Guatemala, Bangladesh, Tanzania, Bolivia, Kenya, Uganda, Burkina Faso, Nepal, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Madagascar and Ethiopia.

There are four beneficiaries from Ghana, two beneficiaries from Nepal, two beneficiaries from Benin Republic; two from Guatemala while only one from the rest of the countries are to benefit from  the research grant.

As reported by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in its website, these twenty women scientists will receive this research grants to lead research projects at their home institutes, and to build up research groups that will attract international visitors.

The twenty Early Career fellows were chosen based on the high load of their research proposals couple with their proven scientific excellence as well as leadership skills.

As reported by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in its website, they include a computer scientist from Tanzania building an application to help farmers diagnose poultry diseases through deep learning technology, a biologist from Laos trying to catalog and preserve the diversity of reptiles and amphibians in her country, and a biologist from Guatemala harnessing the natural detoxification properties of aquatic plants to filter harmful contaminants from lakes.

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The Organization of Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD) is a fellowship program founded in 1987 and being the first ever international arena to bring women scientists from developed and developing worlds with the aims of enhancing their roles in the development process and raise their representation in scientific and technological leadership.

Organization of Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD) make means for research training, career development and networking opportunities for women scientists throughout the developing world at different stages in their careers.

The Organization of Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD) is jointly funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) and Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC).

As stated in Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD) website, these are the fellows:

REFERENCES:

https://www.idrc.ca/en/stories/world-needs-more-women-scientists

https://en.unesco.org/news/research-grants-support-20-early-career-women-scientists-developing-world

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